Denver Station 4

Station 4 – Lower Downtown

Rick Luebke Photo ©

(District 2) Fire Station 4 is located at 1890 Lawrence St. and opened in 1974.

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

DISTRICT CHIEF 2

Rick Luebke Photo ©

(A628) 2013 Ford Expedition 4×4. District Chief 2 covers Station 1, 3, 4, 6 and 11.

Rick Luebke Photo ©

TRUCK 4

Rick Luebke Photo ©

(T56) 2015 Pierce Velocity (27970) 100′ rear-mount aerial ladder.

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

MED 1

(No Picture At This Time)

2008 Ford Expedition 4x4x, former District Chief. Med 1 is in service every Friday and Saturday nights from 16:00 to 4:00, and responds on lower priority calls in the downtown district.

Station 4 Historical Photos

Station 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

Fire Station 4 officially opened at 2026 Curtis St. on January 8, 1883, and replaced an all volunteer Hook & Ladder Co. Steamer 4 and Hook & Ladder 2 that operated out of the station which was later rebuilt to accommodate a larger, motorized apparatus.

HOOK & LADDER 2

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

Hook & Ladder Company Firefighters (Horse Team) preparing the team of horses.

ENGINE Co. No. 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

SQUAD No. 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

1920’s American Lafrance.

ENGINE No. 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

American LaFrance, shown here circa 1937.

Station 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

For many years 3 Companies ran out of the two bay Station 4. Engine No. 4 parked in the back of the bay with Squad 4 in front. Truck No. 4 occupied the other bay. In 1962 Squad No. 4 was disbanded and became Squad No. 8.

Photo ©

Shown here in 1965.

ENGINE No. 4

Rick Luebke Photo ©

1953 Seagrave. Engine No. 4 caught fire in 2013 in the front of the Denver Firefighters Museum, the engine was completely restored and back on display at the museum in 2015. Story here: Denver Engine No. 4 Fire.

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Kyler Hewes Photo ©

Charles Broshous Photo ©

SQUAD No. 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

1949 American LaFrance.

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Mike Laven Photo ©

Mike Laven Photo ©

TRUCK No. 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

1949 American LaFrance 100′ mid-mount ladder.

Station 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

The current Station 4 opened in 1974 at 1890 Lawrence Street.

ENGINE No. 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

1950 Seagrave, shown here running as Reserve Engine 4.

TRUCK 4

Duane Troxel Photo ©

(T-17) 1967 Seagrave (800KA-100 / Q-4181) 100′ mid-mount aerial ladder, also ran as Truck 12.

Rick Davis Photo ©

ENGINE No. 4

Duane Troxel Photo ©

1970 Seagrave 300 gallon water tank / 1000 gpm pump.

Station 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

Station 4 with Engine 4, 1984 Seagrave and Truck 4 1980 Seagrave 100′ rear-mount.

TRUCK 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

1980 Seagrave 100′ rear-mount aerial ladder.

ENGINE 4

Shaun Ryan Photo ©

(E-64) 1984 Seagrave (HB-40DC / R-79409) 500 gallon water tank / 1250 gpm pump, was in service until 1987 when TAC 4 was placed into service.

TRUCK 4

Rick Luebke Photo ©

(T-03) 1986 E-One Hurricane 110′ rear-mount aerial ladder quint 300 gallon water tank / 1500 gpm pump, former TAC 4 and also ran as Quint 8 and Truck 15.

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

AERIAL TOWER 4

Shaun Ryan Photo ©

(T-29) 1982 Sutphen (TS100 / HS-1639) 100′ 300 gallon water tank / 1500 gpm pump, former Tower 1.

TAC 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

(T-03) 1986 E-One Hurricane 110′ rear-mount aerial ladder quint 300 gallon water tank / 1500 gpm pump, and was staffed with 4, the midi pumper that was staffed with 2. Many departments across the country were trying similar concepts and due to budget problems Denver Fire Department elected to save the cost of the two firefighters who would have been needed to staff the Engine.

TRUCK 4

Rick Davis Photo ©

1986 E-One 100′ rear-mount aerial platform quint 300 gallon water tank / 1500 gpm pump, also ran as Tower 4. 

Jeremiah Herderich Photo ©

Bart Richards Photo ©

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

TOWER 4

Shaun Ryan Photo ©

1987 E-One 100′ rear-mount aerial platform quint 300 gallon water tank / 1250 gpm pump, also ran as Truck 4. 

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

Shown here with the newer graphics.

TAC 4

Shaun Ryan Photo ©

(E-66) 1986 Ford F-700 / E-One 500 gallon water tank / 1000 gpm pump, also ran as Pumper 4. TAC 4 responded to trash fires, medical calls and structural fires with Tower 4. Fire Station 11 also operated a TAC unit and ran as TAC 11. In 1988 TAC 11 was involved in a rollover accident, which brought an end to using the TAC units.

MED VAN 4

Photo Courtesy of Denver Fire Department Museum

After TAC 4 was disbanded in 1988, Tower 4 remained in service without an Engine running beside it. Due to the high medical call volume a new concept was instituted in 1991. Med Van 4 was placed in service with two firefighters who took all the first out EMS runs for the Tower. This trial program also lasted just one year.

RESCUE 1

Rick Davis Photo ©

1992 Seagrave, also ran out of Station 11.

Jeremiah Herderich Photo ©

Station 4

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Fire Station 4 shown here in 2008 with the white bay doors.

TOWER 4

Rick Luebke Photo ©

(T44) 2005 Pierce Lance 100′ rear-mount aerial platform, replaced in May of 2015 by Truck 4, a 2015 Pierce Velocity and became Tower 15.

Kyler Hewes Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©

John Baker Photo ©

Rick Luebke Photo ©